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LIVRES

Knowing bodies, moving minds : towards embodied teaching and learning

Bresler, Liora
Dordrecht [Netherlands] ; Boston : Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004

This book aims to define new theoretical, practical, and methodological directions in educational research centered on the role of the body in teaching and learning. Based on our phenomenological experience of the world, it draws on perspectives from arts-education and aesthetics, as well as curriculum theory, cultural anthropology and ethnomusicology. These are arenas with a rich untapped cache of experience and inquiry that can be applied to the notions of schooling, teaching and learning.
The book provides examples of state-of-the-art, empirical research on the body in a variety of educational settings. Diverse art forms, curricular settings, educational levels, and cultural traditions are selected to demonstrate the complexity and richness of embodied knowledge as they are manifested through institutional structures, disciplines, and specific practices.[editor summary]
This book aims to define new theoretical, practical, and methodological directions in educational research centered on the role of the body in teaching and learning. Based on our phenomenological experience of the world, it draws on perspectives from arts-education and aesthetics, as well as curriculum theory, cultural anthropology and ethnomusicology. These are arenas with a rich untapped cache of experience and inquiry that can be applied to ...


Cote : 128.6 B842k 2004

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ARTICLES DE LIVRES

Toward the pattern models of creativity : chaos, complexity, creativity

Laycraft, Krystyna C.
2014

This chapter provides a new approach to the study of creativity of adolescents and young adults by combining the idea of self-organization with theories of emotions. To gather data for this qualitative research, hermeneutic phenomenology/ontology linked with the narrative/biography methods was chosen. As a process of interpretation of the data, pattern models of the process of creativity are designed. There are some unique differences between the models of different participants’ creativity, but in general they share common phases such as differentiation/chaos, integration/complexity, and dissipative structures/creativity (products of creativity in the forms of new movements, new writings, and new paintings). Creativity of young people is intertwined with strong emotions of interest, joy, acceptance, which enhance mental activity to global, open, and exploratory modes of attention, stimulate their thinking and enrich their imagination.These cognitive processes then deepen their emotions to complex emotions such as curiosity, enthusiasm, delight, passion, resourcefulness, and love, which, through a reciprocal reinforcement influence their selves. Creative people become more sensitive, more open, and 2 receptive to the internal and external world. They develop into resourceful, imaginative, empathic, and spiritual human beings. [author summary]
This chapter provides a new approach to the study of creativity of adolescents and young adults by combining the idea of self-organization with theories of emotions. To gather data for this qualitative research, hermeneutic phenomenology/ontology linked with the narrative/biography methods was chosen. As a process of interpretation of the data, pattern models of the process of creativity are designed. There are some unique differences between ...


Cote : 153.350 1 L427t 2014

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MEMOIRES ET THESES

The impact of circus arts instruction on the physical literacy of children in grades 4 and 5

Kiez, Tia K. M. ; Kriellaars, Dean
Winnipeg : University of Manitoba, 2015

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of circus arts instruction on the physical literacy (PL) of children in grades 4 and 5. Methods: A prospective, clustered, quasi-experimental design was used to compare schools with circus arts instruction in physical education class (PE CIRCUS) to three matched schools using standard Physical Health and Education curriculum delivery (PE). PL assessments were obtained at the beginning and end of one semester using PLAY Tools (physicalliteracy.ca). These tools provided an assessment of 1) motor competence, confidence, and comprehension, 2) the child's self-report of physical literacy, 3) the PE teacher's surrogate assessment of the child, 4) the parental assessment of the child, and 5) an inventory of the child's activities. Results: 211 students participated, with equal numbers in grades 4 and 5, and an even distribution between PE and PE CIRCUS groups. There were significant (p<0.05) improvements in motor competence in movement skills (curricular linked) over time for both school settings, but with substantial endpoint differences (7.9%, p<0.01) in favour of PE CIRCUS for 15 of 18 movement skills in grade 5 only. The gender gap in motor competence in the PE CIRCUS group was smaller than that in the PE group. Children in the PE CIRCUS schools revealed greater movement terminology comprehension and higher confidence in execution (p<0.05). Children in the PE CIRCUS schools reported greater confidence, felt more talented, were more eager to participate (p=0.055), and girls associated physical activity with happiness (p<0.05) more than those in the PE schools. Conclusion: Circus arts instruction can effectively aid in the development of physical literacy in children. Providing a quality physical literacy experience, such as circus arts instruction, does not amplify the gender gap, but provides equitable levels of motor competence development for males and females, and assists with achieving current PE curricular objectives. The results of this study provide insight to allow for further development of effective physical education delivery methods in schools, and provide quantitative research to support the positive effects of circus arts instruction reported qualitatively. [author summary]
The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of circus arts instruction on the physical literacy (PL) of children in grades 4 and 5. Methods: A prospective, clustered, quasi-experimental design was used to compare schools with circus arts instruction in physical education class (PE CIRCUS) to three matched schools using standard Physical Health and Education curriculum delivery (PE). PL assessments were obtained at the beginning and end ...


Cote : 372.860 1 K478i 2015

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MEMOIRES ET THESES

Why circus works : how the values and structures of circus make it a significant developmental experience for young people

Bolton, Reginald
Perth, 2004

Circus is increasingly being used as a developmental and remedial activity for children. However, it is in the paradoxical nature of circus that it operates in a way both mysterious and easily accessible. This thesis proposes that circus as education is more effective when both teacher and student have a better understanding of circus as an art form.

To explain this I first introduce six 'elements' of childhood, whose absence often seems to result in an incomplete personal maturity. I then conduct a wide exploration of both the real and the imagined circus, showing how these elements occur or are evoked there, and I establish a correspondence or 'homology' between the two entities - childhood and circus. The discoveries shed light on the aesthetic code of circus itself, leading to the conclusion that circus works as an artform because its essential composition recalls profound experiences of childhood.

I argue that contemporary Western childhood presents unexpected hazards, mostly involving passivity and over-protection. In other parts of the world, and in some Western populations, childhood has other problems, linked to deprivation, exploitation and physical danger. In either case, a child involved in circus activities has a chance to make good some deficits, by experiencing constructive physical risk, aspiration, trust, fun, self-individuation and hard work. My hope is that this dissertation will contribute some strength to the case for well-designed programmes of circus activities for young people, in both formal and informal settings. [author summary]
Circus is increasingly being used as a developmental and remedial activity for children. However, it is in the paradoxical nature of circus that it operates in a way both mysterious and easily accessible. This thesis proposes that circus as education is more effective when both teacher and student have a better understanding of circus as an art form.

To explain this I first introduce six 'elements' of childhood, whose absence often seems to ...


Cote : 791.307 1 B6943w 2004

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

The impact of circus arts instruction in physical education on the physical literacy of children in grades 4 and 5

Kriellaars, Dean ; Cairney, John ; Bortoleto, Marco Antonio Coelho ; Kiez, Tia K. M. ; Dudley, Dean ; Aubertin, Patrice
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education vol.38 n°2, p.162-170 , 2019

Objective: To examine the impact of circus arts instruction in physical education (PE) on the physical literacy of children in Grades 4 and 5.

Methods: A clustered, quasi-experimental design was used comparing children in schools with circus arts instruction in physical education (n = 101) with children in socioeconomic status-matched schools using standard PE instruction (n = 110). Physical literacy assessments performed at the beginning and end of one semester using the Physical Literacy Assessment for Youth tools.

Results: Significant improvements in motor competence for both groups; endpoint differences favored the circus arts instruction in physical education schools for 15 of 18 movement skills for Grade 5 and 7 of 18 skills for Grade 4 (p < .05), with corresponding increases in children’s confidence and comprehension of movement terminology, as well as active participation. The gap in motor competence between girls and boys in the circus arts instruction in physical education schools was smaller than in standard PE schools.

Conclusions: Circus arts instruction enriched PE can effectively aid in the development of physical literacy in children with greater gender equity. [editor summary]
Objective: To examine the impact of circus arts instruction in physical education (PE) on the physical literacy of children in Grades 4 and 5.

Methods: A clustered, quasi-experimental design was used comparing children in schools with circus arts instruction in physical education (n = 101) with children in socioeconomic status-matched schools using standard PE instruction (n = 110). Physical literacy assessments performed at the beginning and e...


Cote : 372.860 1 K478i 2019

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

Children's integration into community life : opportunities for meaningful participation and for developing multi-age relationships

Leidums, Kristina
2014

The integration of children into the daily lives of their communities, and engagement with adults in productive activities and shared endeavours, are two positive elements which have been previ-ously overlooked in discussions of alternative educational approaches. Children, families and communities all benefit when children have regular opportunities to be embedded in the daily social fabric of family and community life, interacting across ages and generations. Interviews with families enrolled in British Columbia's SelfDesign Learning program demonstrate how the opportunities possible for children who learn outside of school are broad, powerful and should be recognized as legitimate by anyone involved with children. [author summary]
The integration of children into the daily lives of their communities, and engagement with adults in productive activities and shared endeavours, are two positive elements which have been previ-ously overlooked in discussions of alternative educational approaches. Children, families and communities all benefit when children have regular opportunities to be embedded in the daily social fabric of family and community life, interacting across ages ...


Cote : 303.327 083 L527c 2014

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

The effect of circus activity training on postural control of 5-6 year old children

Sahli, Sonia ; Ghroubi, S. ; Rebai, Haithem ; Chaabane, Mokhtar ; Yahia, A. ; Pérennou, Dominic ; Elleuch, Mohamed Habib
Science & Sports vol 28 n° 1, February 2013

Objectives : The purpose of the present study is to assess the effect of circus activity training on postural control of 5–6-year old children.

Material and methods : Two groups of 5–6-year old children (12 practicing circus activities and 12 controls) voluntarily participated in this study. Children were asked to stand as still as possible on a force platform with eyes open and closed in a static posture and in two dynamic postures (in the sagittal or frontal plane). Postural control was assessed with centre of pressure excursions.

Results : The results revealed that Circus group children have significant (P < .05) better postural control than controls. The significant (P < .05) effect of postural task difficulty on postural control was similar for both groups. Removal of vision decreases significantly (P < .05) the postural control of both groups similarly in all postures. This effect increased significantly (P < .05) when the difficulty of the postural task increased.

Conclusion : Our results suggest that 2 years of experience in circus activity training improves postural control of 5–6-year old children. Nevertheless, this effect could not nullify the common effect of removing vision on postural control of these children.
Objectives : The purpose of the present study is to assess the effect of circus activity training on postural control of 5–6-year old children.

Material and methods : Two groups of 5–6-year old children (12 practicing circus activities and 12 controls) voluntarily participated in this study. Children were asked to stand as still as possible on a force platform with eyes open and closed in a static posture and in two dynamic postures (in the ...

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

How experience gets under the skin to create gradients in developmental health

Hertzman, Clyde ; Boyce, Tom
Annual Review of Public Health n°31, p. 329-347, 2010

Social environments and experiences get under the skin early in life in ways that affect the course of human development. Because most factors associated with early child development are a function of socio-economic status, differences in early child development form a socio-economic gradient. We are now learning how, when, and by what means early experiences influence key biological systems over the long term to produce gradients: a process known as biological embedding. Opportunities for biological embedding are tethered closely to sensitive periods in the development of neural circuitry. Epigenetic regulation is the best example of operating principles relevant to biological embedding. We are now in a position to ask how early childhood environments work together with genetic variation and epigenetic regulation to generate socially partitioned developmental trajectories with impact on health across the life course. [authors summary]
Social environments and experiences get under the skin early in life in ways that affect the course of human development. Because most factors associated with early child development are a function of socio-economic status, differences in early child development form a socio-economic gradient. We are now learning how, when, and by what means early experiences influence key biological systems over the long term to produce gradients: a process ...


Cote : 155.418 H576h 2010

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

Fighting gravity : circus arts for adolescents

Davis, Jackie
American Youth Circus Organisation , février 2000


Cote : 791.307 D2611f 2000

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

New Circus : the benefits of Circus Training for young people in a residential setting

Muldoon, Orla ; Kilpatrick, Rosemary ; Leitch, Ruth
Child Care in Practice vol. 2 n°3, p.28-38, March 1996

Circus 1 to 3 is a circus school, based on the concept of New Circus, for boys resident in St. Patrick's Training School, Northern Ireland. The project is designed, not only to teach Circus skills, but also to foster social and personal skills. This report details an evaluation undertaken to assess die extent to which this programme meets these aims. A study of participants Circus records indicated that significant gains in co-operative behaviour, team-work, attitude and participation, as rated by Circus tutors, were evident over the course of boys involvement. A qualitative study was also conducted. These interviews with Circus 1 to 3 participants indicated that this project enhanced the quality of life for boys resident in St. Patrick's Training School. In addition the project, through the use of positive feedback, provides opportunities for boys to develop their social and personal skills. This evaluation concludes that Circus 1 to 3 is a worthwhile and successful endeavour. [authors summary]
Circus 1 to 3 is a circus school, based on the concept of New Circus, for boys resident in St. Patrick's Training School, Northern Ireland. The project is designed, not only to teach Circus skills, but also to foster social and personal skills. This report details an evaluation undertaken to assess die extent to which this programme meets these aims. A study of participants Circus records indicated that significant gains in co-operative ...


Cote : 791.307 104 15 M954n 1996

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