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y Trapèze - Histoire
     

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LIVRES

A reckless era the evolution of trapeze

Gossard, Steve ; Thayer, Stuart
Normal (IL), 2012

A typical nineteenth-century program was overwhelmingly a presentation of horse acts. There were child riders, women riders and men riders. There were two, four and six horse acts. There was hurdle riding, dressage and even horses that performed riderless. From seventy-five to ninety percent of the acts in a circus of that time involved horses. The popularity of the rider was a reflection of the place of the horse in society. Nearly everyone in the nineteenth-century owned, bought, sole, rode or drove horses, even in urban areas. Because of this they appreciated watching fine animals brought to the peak of training.

The decade of the 1880’s saw the beginning of the greatest period of expansion in America. Almost every aspect of life grew at a rapid pace. Immigration, financial structures and the construction of the cities all boomed exponentially. With this, the simple circus of the Civil War era became touched with what has been termed giantism. Competition between the showmen led to the acquisition of herds of elephants, many caged menageries, expanded programs and huge tents, seating as many as seven or eight thousand people. The trapeze acts, which had been confined to single performers in the low-ceilinged tents of the sixties, now became the flying acts of our time. With fifty and sixty foot high tents two and three hundred feet long, there was at least room for these aerial acts, which until that time had been confined to theatres and halls. It was this change that led to the relative demise of the horse acts, which had not changed, essentially, since the beginning of the institution. The trapeze performers, high above the crowd, throwing their bodies through the air, literally defying injury, became the favorites of the crowd. To this day, it is the aerial acts that are the climax of the circus programs.

Surprisingly, the literature of the circus has lagged far behind the popularity of the flying trapeze. Moreover, the history of these acts has been virtually ignored until quite recently. Why this should be, we are not sure, but we are thankful that Steve Gossard has decided to take upon himself the research into and chronicling of that history. There is something of present excitement as well as nostalgia in watching men and women thrust their bodies through the air in what is often the most graceful and athletic pursuits. That their efforts have a long and interesting history is borne out by the pages that follow.
A typical nineteenth-century program was overwhelmingly a presentation of horse acts. There were child riders, women riders and men riders. There were two, four and six horse acts. There was hurdle riding, dressage and even horses that performed riderless. From seventy-five to ninety percent of the acts in a circus of that time involved horses. The popularity of the rider was a reflection of the place of the horse in society. Nearly ...


Cote : 791.340 973 G677r 2012

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LIVRES

Circus acts: the history of circus performers

Jeffrey, SB.
[États-Unis] : Webster's Digital Services, 2011

The content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. This book is about the history of the circus act. Readers will learn about acrobats, the flying trapeze, and the art of tightrope walking. The book also discusses the history of the circus clown, juggling, and the unicyclist. [editor summary]


Cote : 791.309 J46c 2011

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LIVRES

Circus bodies : cultural identity in aerial performance

Tait, Peta
Abingdon [Angleterre] ; New York : Routledge, 2005

This pioneering study is one of the major publications in the increasingly popular and largely undocumented area of circus studies. Through photographs and illustrations, Peta Tait presents an extraordinary survey of 140 years of trapeze acts and the socially changing ideas of muscular action in relation to our understanding of gender and sexuality. She questions how spectators see and enjoy aerial actions, and what cultural identities are presented by bodies in fast, physical aerial movement. [editor summary]
This pioneering study is one of the major publications in the increasingly popular and largely undocumented area of circus studies. Through photographs and illustrations, Peta Tait presents an extraordinary survey of 140 years of trapeze acts and the socially changing ideas of muscular action in relation to our understanding of gender and sexuality. She questions how spectators see and enjoy aerial actions, and what cultural identities are ...


Cote : 791.340 1 T135c 2005

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ARTICLES DE LIVRES

Costume as a technology for flight

Barbieri, Donatella
2017


Cote : 792.026 B236c 2017

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H Disponible en ligne

MEMOIRES ET THESES

Women who fly : aerialists in modernity (1880-1930)

Gils, Bieke
Vancouver : University of British Columbia, 2013

Around 1900, Charmion (alias Laverie Vallée) introduced a provocative ‘trapeze disrobing act,’ combined with feats of strength to her audiences in vaudeville theaters in New York. She was one of a wave of female aerialists whose performances quite literally ‘flew’ in the face of Victorian values. Trapeze artists in circuses and in vaudeville theaters, as well as stunt flying aviators showcasing their courage and abilities during local fairs or aerial exhibitions from the 1910s on, indeed pushed the boundaries of what was deemed possible in terms of the human body’s physical capacities while challenging traditional notions of gender, race, class, and sexuality through their unconventional performances. In this study I explore three cases of aerialists who navigated both the demands of managers/spectators for spectacular and titillating acts and their personal aspirations within the confines of the increasingly capitalist entertainment industries in the West between 1880 and 1930. Besides Charmion, my study takes shape around the performances of “Barbette” or Vander Clyde who took Parisian theaters by storm with an amalgamation of trapeze artistry and female impersonation in interwar France; and Bessie Coleman, the first African American woman to gain a pilot license and to set up her own flying shows throughout the United States in the 1920s. For each case study I conducted exhaustive archival searches and analysed relevant newspaper articles, magazines, show reviews, photographs and silent film. I draw on Mikhail Bakhtin’s concepts of the carnivalesque and the grotesque, and on Victor Turner’s concept of liminality to illustrate how aerial performances between 1880 and 1930 functioned as sites of creative resistance, opening up possibilities for a rethinking and redefinition of social categories of gender, race, class, and sexuality. I show how the performances of Charmion, Coleman and Barbette simultaneously reflected and challenged the anxieties and optimism of a society forced to revisit traditional beliefs regarding the gendered/racialized/classed/sexualized body. In demonstrating how these performers helped question modernizing beliefs regarding the human body’s capacities, and the female body’s physical abilities and appearance in particular, I argue they suggested new types of embodied agency for both women and men at the time. [editor summary]
Around 1900, Charmion (alias Laverie Vallée) introduced a provocative ‘trapeze disrobing act,’ combined with feats of strength to her audiences in vaudeville theaters in New York. She was one of a wave of female aerialists whose performances quite literally ‘flew’ in the face of Victorian values. Trapeze artists in circuses and in vaudeville theaters, as well as stunt flying aviators showcasing their courage and abilities during local fairs or ...


Cote : 791.340 82 G4895w 2013

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

Trapecio

Arnall, Anna
Zirkolika, 2013


Cote : ZIR-37

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

Le gymnasiarque toulousain Jules Léotard

Pachany, Michèle
Le Cirque dans l'univers, décembre 2009

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

Victor Fomine, the wizard of the swinging trapeze

Jando, Dominique
Spectacle, mai 2009

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ARTICLES DE PERIODIQUES

Trapèzes et autres formes géométriques

Jacob, Pascal
Arts de la piste n°26, p.18-20, octobre 2002

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Disponibilité
Type
Sujets

Trapèze - Histoire [9]

Histoire des arts du cirque - États-Unis [3]

Léotard, Jules [artiste de cirque] [3]

Artistes de cirque - Biographies [2]

Arts du cirque - Philosophie et théorie [2]

Barbette [artiste de cirque] [2]

Histoire de l'acrobatie aérienne [2]

Identité culturelle [2]

Représentation de la femme dans les arts du cirque [2]

Représentation du corps circassien [2]

Travestisme [2]

Acrobatie aérienne [1]

Acrobatie aérienne - Costume [1]

Acrobatie aérienne - Histoire [1]

Adler, Felix [clown] [1]

Archaos [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Art clownesque - Histoire [1]

Artiste de cirque Afro-Européens [1]

Artistes de cirque - États-Unis - Biographies [1]

Artistes de cirque - France - Biographies [1]

Artistes de cirque afro-américains [1]

Bailey, James Anthony [directeur de cirque] [1]

Barnum, Phineas Taylor [directeur de cirque] [1]

Cameron Coup, William [1]

Charmion [artiste de cirque] [1]

Circus Oz [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Cirque au cinéma [1]

Cirque du Soleil [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Coleman, Bessie [aviatrice] [1]

Costumes de cirque - Histoire [1]

Costumes de cirque - Philosophie et théorie [1]

Costumes de spectacle - Philosophie et théorie [1]

Degas, Edgar [peintre] [1]

DeSanto, Greg [clown] [1]

DeSanto, Karen [clown] [1]

Esthétique des arts du cirque [1]

Études sur le genre [1]

Femmes - Identité [1]

Femmes artistes de cirque [1]

Fil de fer - Histoire [1]

Foires [1]

Fomine, Victor [professeur de cirque] [1]

Formateurs de cirque - Biographies [1]

Freire Brother's [troupe de cirque] [1]

Grimaldi, Joseph [clown] [1]

Hanlon Lees [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Histoire de la jonglerie [1]

Histoire des arts du cirque - 19e siècle [1]

Histoire des arts du cirque - 20e siècle [1]

Histoire des arts du cirque - France [1]

Homme-canon [1]

Jacobs, Lou [clown] [1]

Leers, Luisita [artiste de cirque] [1]

Miss Lala [artiste de cirque] [1]

Pepin and Breschard [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Poliakoff, Nicolai [clown] [1]

Rice, Dan [clown] [1]

Ricketts, John Bill (1769-1800) [1]

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Ringling Brothers Circus [compagnie de cirque] [1]

Spectacles d'aviation - Histoire [1]

Suspension de mâchoire [1]

Terminologie des arts du cirque [1]

Trapèze - Étude et enseignement [1]

Trapèze ballant [1]

Trapeze Disrobing Act [oeuvre cinématographique] [1]

Trapèze fixe [1]

Trapèze volant [1]

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